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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
part of this great country of ours, every region, small town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nations of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio secretary. >> i moved jon husted be designated as the ex-officio secretary of the 53rd electoral college. >> moving that mr. husted be designated. all those in favor by saying aye. opposed? ayes have it. mr. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we electors are about to cast our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment of the united states constitution. separate votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced,
, new york -- at least where you have a large big city and minorities, they like to cut them off. >> the thing is, there are no rules in the constitution about picking electors to the electoral college. every state gets to -- >> why do they -- >> it became the consensus position over time. that winner takes all. if you wanted to do the system, could you make the argument that you should drop off electoral votes by population in every state. that would be fair if you did that in every state, in which case it would reflect the popular vote. but that's not what they are doing here and they tried to do this before this election and even a more weighted way. if you win the congressional district, you get the electoral from that district and under that situation, obama winning pennsylvania would have gotten seven out of the 20 electoral votes. >> ron, fb you're in a minority community, it seems that you want it the way it is now because leverage in from michigan to detroit, for example. or chicago. if it was just every person and you didn't give that bloc vote power to people, be they
be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and you would have a full-fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that and the possibiliti
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
. owner and operator of 101 which is highway 101 through the city. this item attributes to several actions. to reflect also the obtainment of a large fta grant. we happily we received a $50 million from the federal transit administration to support the project. part of that funding will be passed over to the authority and part of our previously prop 8 funds will be passed over to mta. this is all to cover some of the work already happened and budgeted for back in the 2010 appropriation as well as reflect the past year. over the past year, the agencies have all done significant work to refine and develop the locally preferred alternative both agencies have been incurred a bit of additional cost. we have also added more consultant support to the budget. the memorandum of agreement will also update the project budget to add about $1.1 million of total project budget to bringing total project cost up to $6.7 million range. again, this additional cost is fully covered by the federal transit administration grant and no additional funding is being sought today. finally this memorandum of agreemen
districts. there are issues around displacement, the impact of a large hospital on the surrounding neighborhoods, and whether the size of this hospital and plans in the city wide picture of health care access. i am sure we will have robust discussion about this in the coming months. >> are there any other issues that concern you that we have not discussed? are there any other interests you plan to concentrate on as supervisor? >> one thing every supervisor works on is the relationship between our neighborhoods and city hall. i am blessed in district 3 to have a rich network of neighborhood associations, merchant groups, and nonprofit organizations that i interface with regularly. they often had difficulty navigating city hall. i am trying to help develop neighborhood councils that bring together these various groups to interface with city hall and city staff as a model to foster partnerships between and our neighborhoods and city government. it is a model we have been working on for a couple of years in district 3. i hope to replicate it to out san francisco fairly soon. >> we are
're discussing possible bond measures. >>> crews are making progress in repairing a large sinkhole on mountain view drive in lafayette. the city council also adopted an emergency declaration, establishing a $1 million budget to fix the road's drainage problem. that huge sinkhole opened up during that major storm last sunday. >>> the bart expansion in fremont has run into an unforeseen problem with birds, and it comes with a $5 million price tag. the crew has installed inflatable dancers, such as the ones found outside used car lots to discourage birds from nesting. >>> a judge heard arguments in a case that involves privacy rights and the first amendment. >> reporter: he's known as one of san francisco's most outspoken gay rights activists, but he had little to say today as he pleaded not guilty to misdemeanor disorderly conduct. >> it snaps of political retribution. >> reporter: he took this photo of scott wiener and blogged that he tried to photograph him at a urinal. >> we will be fighting this case. and i think that despite the fact that the photograph was taken, we're talking fundamentall
in repairing a large sinkhole on mountain view drive in  lafayette. the city council also adopted an emergency declaration, establishing a $1 million budget to fix the road's drainage problem. that huge sinkhole opened up during that major storm last sunday. >>> the bart expansion in fremont has run into an unforeseen problem with birds, and it comes with a $5 million price tag. the crew has installed inflatable dancers, such as the ones found outside used car lots to discourage birds from nesting. >>> a judge heard arguments in a case that involves privacy rights and the first amendment. >> reporter: he's known as one of san francisco's most outspoken gay rights activists, but he had little to say today as he pleaded not guilty to misdemeanor disorderly conduct. >> it snaps of political retribution. >> reporter: he took this photo of scott wiener and blogged that he tried to photograph him at a urinal. >> we will be fighting this case. and i think that despite the fact that the photograph was taken, we're talking fundamentally about a photograph of a gentleman at a sink. >> repor
to hold on to customer. >> we have seen circuit city, borders the bookstore go out of business largely because of competition with amazon and there are a number of smaller retailers that have closed down because they couldn't compete with m son. >> amazon was started in the mid 19950 to sell books online and made no profit. but it became clear that the founder said his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. it expanded in the 1990s into electronics, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002 and today amazon is a $100 billon global company. and though basal has declineded our request for an interview, he recently told for june magazine-snow. >> we like to find is there somebody out there doing some element better than we? two it and if so, how do we improve? >> reporter: while that may be good news for millions of consumers who enjoy amazon's low prices, it is daunting for many businesses, even though that call amazon a partner. >> it's a wolf in sheep's clothing is probably the better wie to describe it. >> this woman is a retail
and advised all manners of clients in the real world of new york city. businesses, large and small, and individuals. as a true generalist, she has tried a wide variety of cases and her professional accomplishments and accolades are numerous, including serving as head of the litigation section, the largest section of the american bar association. she was, in fact, a pioneer in this position as the first asian-american to hold this prestigious post. second, on the point of moderation. when i mess miss schofield, i was struck -- met miss schofield, i was struck by the fact that she has one singular agenda -- the preservation of the rule of law. indeed, her professional work has been devoted to the general improvement of the practice of law and to zealously representing her clients in the best and most ethical traditions of the profession. evidence of her moderation can be found in the support she has across the political spectrum. both democrats and republicans have called notice tell me what a great -- me to tell me what a great judge she'll make. she's done everything from teaching
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
to hold on to customers. >> here in the u.s., we've seen circuit city, the electronics store, borders, the bookstore, go out of business. largely because of competition with amazon. >> reporter: based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid-'90s to sell books online. and for years made no profit. but it soon became clear that founder jeff bezos and his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, jewelry, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002, and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though bezos declined our request for an interview, he recently told "fortune" magazine's andy serwer -- >> our goal is to be the most customer obsessed company. is there someone doing some element better than we? if so, how do we improve? >> online shopping is still only 10% of total retail. >> reporter: meaning amazon in all likelihood is just getting started. ben stein told me recently he has never seen a company dominate
groundbreaking series coming sandman -- [cheers and applause] collected a large number of u.s. awards in its 75 issue run. i was a city hall and a young woman said to have every single one of those. including nine will eisner comic industry were simply heard heard the words. in 1991, the first comic i virtue received literary award for best short stories. he's also won the coveted two. a word. mr. gaiman is credited with being a creator of modern comics as well as some out there who's worked and reached audiences of all ages. he is listed in the dictionary of literary biography as a top 10 living postmodern writers and is a prolific writer of prose, poetry, film, journalism, comics, song lyrics and drama. it is a, please welcome me and give anyone fairfax and george mason welcome to mr. neil gaiman. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> there are an awful lot of view. [laughter] hello. right, so the plan for this evening. there is one. although i only decided what it was about four minutes ago. so there is a plan. the plan is as follows. i couldn't decide whether
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
in the streets of our cities. it doesn't belong where it can be picked up easily by a grievance killer who can walk into a workplace, a mall, a theate and now an elementary school and kill large numbers. >> ifill: explain to our viewers what you are planning to introduce have changed what happened in newtown connecticut >> well, over time that weapon would be much less available. what we're trying to do is ban the sale, the manufacture, the transfer, the importation of assault weapons. it gets quite technical. i won't go into that right now. granather weapons that people already have. subject those weapons either to licensing or to a trigger lock. and spell out those grandfathered weapons which would be over 900 in the bill so nobody can say, oh, we took our... their hunting weapon away. then i'd be able to say here's your hunting weapon. it's specifically exempted in the bill. >> ifill: we're talking about prospective law, not one... >> that's right, that's right. it would ban approximately 100 weapons by actual name. and then weapons by physical characteristics. >> ifill: let's talk about th
not bomb from the air civilian targets and they didn't by and large. the liftoff had always said announcements and penalties for people who violated the strict instructions not to cause civilian damage until about a year into the war then made a navigation error, struck the city of london, the docks of london. churchill says, i'll show you how that works. the bomb our civilian targets, obama berlin. he bones milan. ... one, berlin is 100 on london. perot loses the war, but he destroys london's -- london from the air. and, of course, the british and the americans who had this was a war crime remembered that deal. by the end of the war, no one had the nerve to bring charges that nuremberg for the war crime of civilian bombing from the air . that tells us, i think, how even if we had in agreement with the other side of of cyber war have those laws would actually play out. we would not be able to contain a cyber war anymore than we could contain bombing from the air, which means that essentially we are engaged in a fool's errand to try and get legal norms on cyber war. it is not goin
over 40 schools in new york city that are destroyed, mostly by the water. roads, bridges, you name it. the devastation is everywhere, it is wide, it is deep. and so with this kind of devastation, even a large area like new york cannot handle it on its own. and fortunately, mr. president, we've had a wisdom here in this government for close to a century, and that is when nature strikes, when the hand of god comes down on earth and creates the kind of damage that man can't comprehend, that no locality can handle it on its own, and so the federal government steps in. which means the country as a whole steps in. and when there were hurricanes in louisiana and mississippi, the whole country stepped in. we said we know this is too much for to you handle alone. when there were forest fires out west, the whole country stepped in saying we know you can't handle this kind of devastation on your own. when there was flooding in the missouri and mississippi valleys, the same. the federal government came in. and we in new york, hundreds of millions, probably over the decades, billions of our tax do
things in america work. l'enfant, who designed washington's city, there was competition. he submitted the designs for a polis. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly awe inspiring. in 1821, a european diplomat said it was neither large nor awe inspiring but the answer the congressman dave said the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> the key -- vicky goldberg has gathered a few of her paper white house totals. watch sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific on american history tv. >> bankamerica ceo brian monahan said the government, lenders and borrowers have to reset their expectations on home ownership. he called for fannie mae, freddie mac and the federal health administration to return to the primary focus on helping low and moderate income homebuyers. he spoke at a brookings institution and bent on future of home ownership. this is just under an hour. >> good morning. i'm vice president and co- director of the economic study program at brookings, i'm pl
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)